The history of The Lone Star State is steeped in separation from the rest of the nation.

But does that translate to Texans’ taste in beer and liquor as well?

Despite many often visualizing Texas as an arid desert filled with small country towns, Texas is also home to a number of thriving national metropolitan areas such as Dallas and Houston. Its culinary identity is often characterized and deeply rooted within traditional Mexican and American cuisine. However, some Texan establishments are also making waves within the industry and pushing the envelope in modern and creative offerings.

With all of this in mind, the landscape of Texas is made up of a curious blend of cultures and personalities. In our latest trends report, we take a closer look at our user base within Texas to see how their ordering trends might differ from those of the rest of our users.

The following material aggregates a year’s worth of ordering data ending in March 2017 from BevSpot users in the state of Texas. All figures represent percentages of orders in dollar terms.


Right off the bat, we see some interesting divergences from the norm when looking at beer. While Bud Light still sits at the top (and by a larger margin at that), we see leanings and preferences towards brands that have struggled to match up nationally. Karbach and Shiner, two local Texas offerings, stand out. National brands Michelob and Dos Equis make waves as well. Perhaps Texans are just fans of the most interesting man in the world.


When we take a wider view into the world of liquor and spirits in Texas, the differences between Texas and the rest of the nation start to get slightly more subtle. The largest change that we see is a heavier emphasis on whiskey, which subsequently pulls down the performance of the other spirit types.


Diving a little deeper, a look into the performance of tequila brands almost mirrors that of beer. Patrón, which leads nationally, performed slightly better in our Texas users. Also, brands that did not show up nationally make their presence felt here, with brands like El Jimador, Sauza, and Cimarrón really standing out.


We even start to see a similar pattern in the performance of vodka brands. The national leader, Tito’s, performs even better in Texas than it does nationally. Local distillers Deep Eddy, Kruto, and Dripping Springs make their mark, as well as French distiller Cîroc.


In the biggest departure from the pattern we’ve noticed so far, we curiously find that Texans (at least in our user base) really like their Canadian whiskey. Specifically Crown Royal (and Fireball). They like it so much that it seriously displaces the rest in the whiskey brands in Texas. This dynamic shift leads to the downfall of brands like Bulleit, Jameson, and Maker’s Mark who all see dips in performance.

Last Call

With the exception of whiskey, we observed a very clear and distinct pattern of ordering within our Texas user base. They generally like what leads nationally more so than the rest of the nation, but also show unique preferences when it comes to other brands of liquor and beer. There is also a definitive loyalty towards local brands, as both Texan brewers and distillers enjoyed a solid level of success when compared to the performance of some larger national brands. It can also be concluded that Texans really like their whiskey, especially Canadian whiskey.

Did you have any opinions on the results of our report? Share them with us in the comments section below.

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